Dragon's Back

Priya Narang

This cosmopolitan city is full of skyscrapers and never-ending night lights which is often stereotyped as the concrete jungle. But if you venture out of the central business districts, you will find that nature is not too far away.

Here’s a guide on things to do and where to eat in Hong Kong.

Breakfast

Tsui Wah Restaurant

This local “ice café” is not made of ice, but Tsui Wah Restaurant offers everything from breakfast foods (congee, macaroni, noodles, toast and sandwiches) all the way through to midnight snacks. There are several branches around HK. My favourite is beef with tossed instant noodles. Prices range from HKD20 to HKD100 depending on what dishes you order. (Delivery is also available but may cost more).

15 Wellington Street, Central

Morning activity

Dragon’s Back

While it’s still early (and before the smog settles in), head to Shek O Road to start this 10km hike at Dragon’s Back. You can get there by taking a red minibus right outside Shau Kei Wan MTR station. If you don’t exercise regularly, then this hike could be a challenge, with stairs and steep climbs as you trek up Shek O Peak. However, you’ll be rewarded with an amazing view of Tung Lung Chau and the surrounding sea.

Dragon's Back

Priya Narang

Shek O Country Park, Shek O

Lunch

Big Wave Bay

As you descend you can walk to Big Wave Bay (Tai Long Wan in Chinese), a beach with small local eateries serving noodles and the like are available to replenish your energy. A prehistoric rock carving revealing geometric designs and animals can also be found there.

Afternoon activity 

If you’re tired from the morning activity, yet you still want to escape from the sky-high buildings, hop on the MTR to Causeway Bay, exit F and take the number 40 minibus on Tan Lung Street to Stanley for a relaxing time.

Stanley Market

Stanley Market

Jennifer Lai

Stanley Market provides visitors with a wide range stalls selling souvenirs and quirky finds from t-shirts to silk clothes, Chinese-styled dresses to kids’ toys. Prices are higher than other street stall markets. Treat yourself to a beer along one of the waterfront promenade restaurants or bars if you prefer to people-watch.

Stanley New Street, Stanley

Murray House

If you prefer to immerse in some historical atmosphere, head to the Murray House. The Hong Kong Maritime Museum is situated on the ground floor of this classical architectural building with restaurants on the upper floors.

Dinner

Seoul Korean Restaurant

Getting back to civilization, we headed to Jordan for dinner. Hidden on Hillwood Road (five minutes walk from Jordan MTR exit D), you will find an array of restaurants offering a variety of cuisines; we ate at Seoul Korean Restaurant. Though this Korean bbq restaurant looked small and the décor was quite old, the Korean bbq we had was amazing.

You can pick different meat or seafood to grill and a platter of small dishes of vegetables, taro, potatoes and the like, is offered as part of your meal. For two people, we had a dish of chicken and another of octopus for the bbq and two bowls of rice and two soft drinks, which cost around HKD300. The portions were quite huge and we almost couldn’t finish it.

33 Hillwood Road, Jordan

Evening activity

Ladies Market

To fulfill any shopping desires you may have, head to Mong Kok’s Ladies Market which opens until nearly 1am. This market is more colourful than the Stanley market, and haggling is encouraged. Don’t be surprised to find branded knock-offs here.

Tung Choi Street, Mong Kok